jbovlaste
a lojban dictionary editing system
User:
Pass:

Home
Get A Printable Dictionary
Search Best Words
Recent Changes
How You Can Help
valsi - All
valsi - Preferred Only
natlang - All
natlang - Preferred Only
Languages
XML Export
user Listing
Report Bugs
Utilities
Status
Help
Admin Request
Create Account
Discussion of "tersu'imei"
[parent] [root]
Comment #2: n-somes versus cardinalities
Curtis W Franks (Wed Feb 3 23:49:51 2016)

krtisfranks wrote:
> The arity of a function is the number of terbri that it has.

But the other thing is that "mei" does not really specify a cardinality,
which is what you want. A number n is associated with "mei" and the
result forms an n-set of the sumti specified; well, it is not really a set
either- it is a mass, but the point is that the mass has n members but is
not the cardinality of the underlying set, which is n. So, the most
reasonable deduction from the veljvo of this word would be something like
"the mass of sumti types" or "the n-some of argument classes", which does
not make much sense. I would suggest conversion of "mei", but the number
specification is, unfortunately, not really a terbri of the word and we
have no way to access it. You just are not talking about n and you cannot
do so with this word and our current grammar. You are talking about the
resultant mass itself. It is as simples as that.

Comment #3: Re: n-somes versus cardinalities
Ilmen (Thu Feb 4 12:24:33 2016)

krtisfranks wrote:
> I suggest that you use the term "terbrimei" or something of the like for
the expression of the idea of arity.

Well I like "terbrimei", so I'll probably make it a synonym of
"tersu'imei", so that people can choose the one they prefer.
I'm unclear on what a tersu'i is actually; according to some it's just a
number (the number of the argument place). That's the kind of situation
where having official usage examples along with the official gismu
definition would have been very helpful.
When I created the word tersu'imei, I was needing a Lojban word for this
meaning and had a hard time finding an appropriate letter string, so I've
ended up with tersu'imei.

As for mei, the x1 is now considered to be a plural, and not a mass/gunma
(see the BPFK section for cmavo), so you can say "lo gerku cu ci mei" ("the
dogs are threesome").

mi'e la .ilmen. mu'o

Comment #4: Re: n-somes versus cardinalities
Curtis W Franks (Fri Feb 5 03:57:44 2016)

Ilmen wrote:
> krtisfranks wrote:
> > I suggest that you use the term "terbrimei" or something of the like
for
> the expression of the idea of arity.
>
> Well I like "terbrimei", so I'll probably make it a synonym of
> "tersu'imei", so that people can choose the one they prefer.
> I'm unclear on what a tersu'i is actually; according to some it's just
a
> number (the number of the argument place). That's the kind of situation
> where having official usage examples along with the official gismu
> definition would have been very helpful.
> When I created the word tersu'imei, I was needing a Lojban word for
this
> meaning and had a hard time finding an appropriate letter string, so I've

> ended up with tersu'imei.
>
> As for mei, the x1 is now considered to be a plural, and not a
mass/gunma
> (see the BPFK section for cmavo), so you can say "lo gerku cu ci mei"
("the
> dogs are threesome").
>
> mi'e la .ilmen. mu'o


Oh, yeah, I forgot about that. But the point remains. In my interpretation,
it does not reference a cardinality but some sort of collection of some
number of elements.

I do agree that we needed a word for the idea. I had been sort of thinking
on it for a while but never came up with a decent solution.

Currently, jbovlaste will accept data for 69 languages.
You are not logged in.

  recent changes jbovlaste main
This is jbovlaste, the lojban dictionary system.
The main code was last changed on Wed 07 Oct 2020 05:54:55 PM PDT.
All content is public domain. By submitting content, you agree to place it in the public domain to the fullest extent allowed by local law.
jbovlaste is an official project of the logical language group, and is now headed by Robin Lee Powell.
E-mail him if you have any questions.
care to log in?